Out here in our part of America, dreams have always begun where the waters come together. The people who first lived on this prairie named their home "Neodesha." [Nee-oh-de-shay]. An Osage word, it means "the meeting of the waters".

To this day Cobalt boats anchor night after night in a tradition of rugged individualism, in the pride of people with extraordinary skills set among a small town's uncompromising notion of what might be. We know these people, the neighbors who come every morning to build these boats. We know their grandparents and their grandkids, second and third generations of families now crafting the fourth decade of Cobalts. These are rooted people, solid in a work ethic born on farms and ranches, people who understand at first hand the ways in which personal accountability serves collective achievement. People who grew up with Cobalt's founder Pack St. Clair in a small town with big ideas. People with a sense of place. And of time.

Cobalt remains a privately held company, its founders still at the helm, still engaged in the daily management of Cobalt design and Cobalt manufacture, still refusing ever to admit that good enough is good enough. We build boats on the premise that, in all our work in Neodesha, no one job is more important than another. There are no assigned parking places here and, if our president arrives at work a few minutes late, he may expect to walk to his office from the far north parking lot. As Cobalt has grown to a company of nearly 600 associates, we try very hard to perpetuate the genuine sense of family that has characterized our interactions with each other from the beginning. And so again tomorrow we will do our part to nourish the implicit trust which underpins our relationships with Cobalt dealers, with Cobalt associates and, of course, with the remarkable people who own Cobalts.

In a place where technology contributes in measurable ways to every component of a Cobalt's construction but where, in ways beyond measure, individual effort and personal integrity have refined the boat-builder's art over more than 30 years of ever more sophisticated design. In a place where a handshake is still sufficient to the sealing of a dream.

 

Out here in our part of America, dreams have always begun where the waters come together. The people who first lived on this prairie named their home "Neodesha." [Nee-oh-de-shay]. An Osage word, it means "the meeting of the waters".

To this day Cobalt boats anchor night after night in a tradition of rugged individualism, in the pride of people with extraordinary skills set among a small town's uncompromising notion of what might be. We know these people, the neighbors who come every morning to build these boats. We know their grandparents and their grandkids, second and third generations of families now crafting the fourth decade of Cobalts. These are rooted people, solid in a work ethic born on farms and ranches, people who understand at first hand the ways in which personal accountability serves collective achievement. People who grew up with Cobalt's founder Pack St. Clair in a small town with big ideas. People with a sense of place. And of time.

Cobalt remains a privately held company, its founders still at the helm, still engaged in the daily management of Cobalt design and Cobalt manufacture, still refusing ever to admit that good enough is good enough. We build boats on the premise that, in all our work in Neodesha, no one job is more important than another. There are no assigned parking places here and, if our president arrives at work a few minutes late, he may expect to walk to his office from the far north parking lot. As Cobalt has grown to a company of nearly 600 associates, we try very hard to perpetuate the genuine sense of family that has characterized our interactions with each other from the beginning. And so again tomorrow we will do our part to nourish the implicit trust which underpins our relationships with Cobalt dealers, with Cobalt associates and, of course, with the remarkable people who own Cobalts.

In a place where technology contributes in measurable ways to every component of a Cobalt's construction but where, in ways beyond measure, individual effort and personal integrity have refined the boat-builder's art over more than 30 years of ever more sophisticated design. In a place where a handshake is still sufficient to the sealing of a dream.

 

 

 

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